I saw a dog that looked more like a cartoon character than a real animal. His expressive eyebrows conveyed so much concern…?

As I walked down the kennel rows today, I saw a dog that looked more like a cartoon character than a real animal. His expressive eyebrows conveyed so much concern, he was almost human. I decided to sit with him, hoping to ease his worries. This is a regular part of my routine at the shelter in a place I’ve grown to love, especially the Sally Port area.

The Sally Port: A Gateway to New Beginnings

The sally port is a safe intake area for new arrivals, kind of like a welcoming zone. This is where we first meet many of our dogs, and it’s crucial to make this first experience a positive one. It sets the tone for their entire stay and can significantly impact their chances of adoption.

The term ‘Sally Port’ is actually a cool throwback to medieval times. Originally, it was a term used for a secure, controlled entryway to a castle – kind of like a secret door for soldiers to ‘sally forth’ (or rush out) during a siege. Fast forward to today, and it’s been borrowed by animal shelters. But instead of knights and battles, it’s all about giving our four-legged pals a stress-free spot to start their shelter journey. So, from castles to kennels, the Sally Port has always been about safety and strategy. Pretty neat, huh?

Building Trust with a Shiba Inu

This particular dog had the distinct look of a Shiba Inu, a breed known for its independence and cat-like demeanor. They’re fascinating creatures, often knowing exactly what they want. Gaining the trust of a Shiba Inu involves patience, understanding, and the occasional treat to break the ice.

The Art of Sitting with Dogs

Sitting with dogs is more than just a pastime; it’s a vital part of my volunteer work. It involves making eye contact, speaking softly, and simply being present. This practice is especially important for new arrivals who are still getting used to the shelter environment. It’s about creating a bond and a sense of safety for them.

A Concerning Discovery

As I spent more time with him, I noticed something alarming. There was a spot on his back, hidden from plain sight, that looked painful. It could have been a bite or a wound, but it was definitely something that needed medical attention. Despite this, he remained stoic, almost as if he was guarding his pain.

The Power of Technology in Building Connections

I often use my phone during these sessions. It’s not just for capturing moments or sharing stories; it’s a practical tool. The phone acts as a sort of mirror, allowing me to see the dog’s reactions without direct eye contact, which can be overwhelming for them.

Microchipping: A Tale of Lost and Found

Today, we discovered that our new Shiba Inu friend had a microchip. However, it led to a dead end as it wasn’t registered. It’s a common issue that turns potential reunions into missed opportunities. This serves as a crucial reminder of the importance of not just microchipping pets but also ensuring the information is up-to-date.

Celebrity Mentions and Naming Adventures

Our conversations at the shelter can sometimes take a light-hearted turn, like when we discuss potential names for our furry friends. Recently, we drifted into the realm of celebrity names, including Taylor Swift. It’s interesting to see how celebrity mentions can stir varied reactions in our community. Some get excited, while others prefer more traditional names. It’s a fun aspect of our daily interactions and a reminder of the diverse perspectives in our community. I have thousands of dogs names in different categories that I can refer to

Choosing a Name: Welcome, Makoto

In the spirit of community involvement, we decided to let our members suggest names for this special Shiba Inu. The winning name was “Makoto,” which means “good” in Japanese. It’s a fitting name for a dog who, despite his challenges, has shown such a good and resilient spirit.

The Power of Positive Affirmations

In my time here, I’ve learned the power of positive affirmations, not just for humans, but for animals too. Telling a dog they’re a good boy or girl, giving them that reassurance, it does wonders for their confidence. It’s a simple act, but it can make a significant difference in their demeanor.

A Community Effort: The Toy Drive

The shelter often runs low on supplies like toys, which are essential for the dogs’ mental and physical well-being. So, I came up with an idea – a toy drive. It’s a call to our community to help fill the shelter with joy and playfulness during the holiday season. It’s amazing how a simple toy can bring so much happiness to these dogs.

Let’s surprise the shelter with the toys they need for these dogs! Click the link to buy and send to: 33751 Mission Trail, Wildomar, CA 92595 or send from whatever place you feel is best. Let’s just fill their lobby so they don’t run low on dog toys ???

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